Posts by Kimberly Davis

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Pulitzer prize winning photographer David Hume Kennerly will show his work and talk about his career as a photo journalist and White House photographer in Austin on November 5th. Kennerly has photographed celebrities such as Muhammad Ali, Robert Kennedy, Mile Davis, the Rolling Stones, Ansel Adams, and Queen Elizabeth and events such as the Vietnam War, the Guiana Massacre, the Ali-Frazier Fight, and many, many more. He was the personal White House photographer for President Gerald Ford. His collection is housed in the University of Texas Briscoe Center for American History.

Kennerly is a Canon Explorer of Light and Canon is sponsoring the program along with Precision Camera & Video and the American Society of Media Photographers Austin/ San Antonio Chapter.

The event is FREE! Seating is limited so come early and enjoy some great photography!

When:
Wednesday November 5, 2014 at 7:00 PM

Where:
First Unitarian Universalist Church of Austin
4700 Grover Ave, Austin, TX 78756

DHKDavid Hume Kennerly won the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for his photos of the Vietnam War when he was 25 years old, one of the youngest to ever receive that honor. Two years later he was appointed President Gerald R. Ford’s personal White House photographer. He was recently named, “One of the Most 100 Most Important People in Photography” by American Photo Magazine. He was a contributing editor for Newsweek, and a contributing photographer for Time and Life magazines. Kennerly has published several books of his work, Shooter, Photo Op, Seinoff: The Final Days of Seinfeld, Photo du Jour, Extraordinary Circumstances: The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford, and most recently David Hume Kennerly On the iPhone. He was a producer and one of the principle photographers of, Barack Obama: The Official Inaugural Book. Kennerly produced “The Presidents’ Gatekeepers,” a four-hour documentary about White House chiefs of staff that ran on The Discovery Channel in 2013, and is currently working on other documentary film projects. Kennerly is on the Board of Trustees of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation, and the Atlanta Board of Visitors of the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). His archive is housed at the Center for American History at the University of Texas, Austin. David Hume Kennerly is a Canon Explorer of Light, an elite group of professional photographers who strongly believe that Canon cameras are essential to their work.

SEO bootcamp for photographers

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the art and science of getting your company to the top of Google and Bing. It’s no secret that both businesses and consumers often go first to search engines when searching for photographers and photography services. But how do you get to the top? Join SEO expert Jason McDonald in this hands-on, practical workshop for photographers. Learn the “rules of the game,” including both how to set up your website and how to create inbound links, and get reviews on sites like Yelp and Google+ Local.

This workshop will be in Houston September 19th and Austin September 20th.

SEO Basics Section 1

~ What IS SEO / getting to the top of Google / BING – why it matters SO much ~ Page Tags / on page optimization: keywords, tags, content ~ Off page / links, freshness, social mentions ~ Metrics – rank checking, Google Analytics

SEO Local Section 2

~ LOCAL seo – localization of SEO ~ LOCAL link building ~ Google+ / YELP and local review issues (how to claim, optimize, leverage) ~ Review marketing: how to get reviews, deal with the hard-to-deal with REVIEW ecosystem

Image Optimization Section 3

~ leveraging images for image search / image optimization ~ shareable images on social media networks ~ leveraging some “free” image giveaways to HELP your SEO

The workshop will teach you the rules of the game, and leave you with a practical to-do list of how to get your company to the top of Google and Bing. Plus it will be a heck of a lot of fun! 

When:

Houston workshop: Friday, September 19, 2014 8:30AM to 4:30PM at TexCam 1323 N 1st St, Bellaire, TX 77401 See Map

Austin workshop: Saturday, September 20, 2014 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM at Precision Camera & Video, 2438 W Anderson Ln, Austin TX See Map

Cost:
$50 off Labor Day Sale!
200.00 — ASMP Members FULL DAY
250.00 — Non-Members FULL DAY
125.00 — ASMP member- Image Optimization ONLY
150.00 — Non-member Image Optimization ONLY

Houston- Friday September 19, 2014 REGISTER HERE

Austin- Saturday September 20, 2014 REGISTER HERE

SEO workshop

Jason McDonald is a recognized SEO expert, based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Besides teaching classes in Internet marketing at Stanford Continuing Studies, the Bay Area Video Academy, and AcademyX, Jason works as an SEO consultant. He helps companies large and small dominate Google, and his methodology is hands-on, practical and fun – designed to teach clients how to play the game of SEO, and how to win. He has a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and an undergraduate degree from Harvard University. Since 1994, he has been active in journalism and Internet marketing, working first in the technology sector and branching out in 2009 to focus on SEO, Social Media Marketing, and AdWords training. He is the author of several popular books on Amazon, including popular toolbooks of free SEO and social media tools. To learn more, simply Google Jason McDonald.

Give the photographer or assistant in your life the gift of an All Access Pass to Texas Photo Roundup in Austin! Register online and simply put their name & email on the first screen and your info on the billing page. Then download this image to print and place under the tree!  This is the gift that keeps on giving!  REGISTER HERE

TPRGiftAllAccessPass

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Photographers Michael O’Brien and Robert Seale will present their award winning photography on November 14, 2013.  This is a not to be missed event for those interested in the best of portrait photography for editorial, advertising and corporate clients.

For the past 40 years, O’Brien has made his living in photography—taking pictures for bands, magazines, newspapers and anyone else who would hire him. He has published two books: The Face of Texas, with his wife Elizabeth O’Brien; and Hard Ground, with Tom Waits. Tom Waits has also refused to invite O’Brien into his band. Elizabeth does allow him to sing, but confines his performances to the shower.”

Robert Seale is one of the most respected editorial and corporate photographers in the world.
Robert Seale is a Houston photographer who specializes in photographing people for magazines, prestigious design firms, corporations, and advertising agencies. He is known for his diverse lighting skills and creative problem solving. His clients include Sports Illustrated, ESPN The Magazine, Businessweek, Forbes, Barron’s, Smithsonian, Air & Space, The New York Times Magazine, The Sporting News, ExxonMobil, BP, Major League Baseball, Tellabs, Schlumberger, Adobe, Reebok, and Under Armour.

FREE to ASMP Members
$10 Non-members
$5 Students

First Unitarian Universalist Church of Austin- 4700 Grover Avenue

7:30-10PM  Doors open at 7

More info and RSVP: http://asmp.org/education/event/info?id=658#.Uge3ZeDGIso

The Business of Architectural Photography with Steve Whittaker

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The business of architectural photography is another aspect that cons tantly requires attention. Estimating, licensing issues, scouting assign ments, creating that shoot list – all are important factors. Once the client signs that contract and pays the 50% retainer, project coordination comes into play. That includes security clearances, site preparation, transportation arrangements, permits, releases and authorization. All of these areas need to be conveyed to the client. This presentation covers all of that and more.

Steve Whittaker’s clients include architects, interior designer= s, advertising agencies, graphic designers, construction, REITs, hospita= lity and corporate direct clients. His assignments cover everything from = aerials, some life style, and interior spaces to illuminating the exteri= or surfaces and interior space of buildings for dramatic dusk images.

He is currently serving his second term as an ASMP director, he is = an advisor with the Oregon Chapter, a Chapter Liaison with multiple ASMP = chapters, and a past President of the ASMP Northern California Chapter.

COST:
FREE — ASMP Member
25.00 — Non-Member
15.00 — PPA, NPPA, or APA Member
10.00 — Student

REGISTER ONLINE!
http://asmp.org/education/event/info?id=688

WHEN:
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
7:15 PM to 9:00 PM
Social time starts at 6:30 PM

Where:
The 9th Street Studio 315 9th Street, # 2, San Antonio, TX 78215
Doors open at 6:30 PM. Program begins at 7:15 PM
Light refreshments will be served.

 

Canon Explorer of Light photographer Eric Meola will be in Austin Thursday, October 3rd.

His graphic color images have appeared editorially in various magazines including Life, Travel & Leisure, Esquire, and Time.  In 1975 he photographed the classic cover for Bruce Springsteen’s album ‘Born to Run’ and since then he has done advertising and corporate photography for clients such as Canon, Kodak, American Express, AT&T, Jeep, BMW, etc.

This event is FREE courtesy of ASMP Austin/San Antonio, Precision Camera, and Canon

WHEN? Thursday October 3rd, 7:30-9:30PM (first come first serve)

WHERE? First Unitarian Universalist Church of Austin- 4700 Grover Avenue

 


Wednesday September 18,  7-9 PM

When are signed Model & Property releases necessary?

What can (and can’t) you do with unreleased images?

What should releases cover?

What should you do about any trademarks that appear in your photos?

How can ASMP Releases App help you get what you need?

ASMP past president Richard Kelly provides an entertaining yet informative look at these questions and more.  Packed with real-world tips and advice for getting subjects comfortable with releases, this program will help you add value to your photographs and money to your pocket.

$25 ASMP members, $50 Non-member, $10 Students

Register Here

 

 

©WyattMcspaddenCowboy

For the past year I’ve had the pleasure of knowing one of my favorite photographers working today. Wyatt McSpadden is enormously talented and also down to earth.  We met for eggs, coffee, and biscuits one morning and in his Texas accent, Wyatt told me stories of his career.

How did you get your start in photography?
I started out working for an eccentric millionaire in Amarillo, a guy by the name of Stanley Marsh 3.  It was 1971 and I was just one of the hippies that worked out on his ranch estate mowing lawns and doing odd jobs. He always had a photographer around too. I had a Minolta SRT 71 camera and I didn’t know what I was doing but there was all this crazy stuff going on around Amarillo.

In 1974, when the art collective Ant Farm started burying Cadillacs in the ground out on Interstate 40, I was documenting that. Every time the design of the tail fin changed, they buried a new Cadillac.  Who ever saw people burying cars in the ground?

This is what I was around and I had a camera and Stanley was buying the film so I was just taking pictures.  I had no agenda.  Through the years the Cadillac Ranch became kind of a phenomenon.  I met famous photographers who flew there to do fashion spreads.

It was really my first documentary photography.  I didn’t think of it like that at the time, but it turns out that’s what it was.

Talk about your longtime collaboration with Texas Monthly.
In 1978 Nancy McMillen, the associate art director of Texas Monthly, called Stanley’s office and asked about shooting him and she wanted a recommendation for a photographer. How could any of us have known just what a fateful call this was? That’s how I met her.  She worked there for 23 years.

Nancy contacted me and of course I was thrilled. All my work had been for local clients, printers, feed yards, small ad agencies – certainly nothing so grand as Texas Monthly. I set up my white background and had Stanley model hats from the enormous collection in his cavernous closet.  And there it was, I had my first pictures in Texas Monthly. A full page! I’ve dragged this old yellowed tear sheet around for 35 years. What a great subject.  He was willing to do anything.

Nancy and I married in 1992, the luckiest day of my life and I’ve somehow managed to keep that Texas Monthly connection alive and well.  That was the first thing I ever did for them, so it has great significance to me. I wouldn’t have had a career if it weren’t for Texas Monthly. At least not the career I’ve had. I’ve been very lucky.

 I wouldn’t have had a career if it weren’t for Texas Monthly.  At least not the career I’ve had.  I’ve been very lucky.

I did marry into the art department, but in a real way it made me step up my game. Nancy is a very discerning art director and photo editor and if I came walking in there with some junk she’d have tossed me out!  I’m sure people talked about it but it really was a situation where you don’t bring your B game!

You probably had more to prove.
And it’s still that way.  It’s amazing to have a relationship with a magazine for 35 years and still be just as eager.

How did it come full circle recently?
Stanley Marsh had been implicated in inappropriate conduct with young boys.  This story came out and Texas Monthly elected to do a major piece about it.  I had photographed Marsh dozens of times, and I had lots and lots of pictures of him in my files.  Some I hadn’t paid much attention to, but I found one that was shockingly appropriate of him for the story, that I’d taken 25 years ago in 1989.

I was looking through my files trying to find pictures of Stanley that Texas Monthly might want to use and there was one that had been published before but it wasn’t the right feel for the story. On the bottom of that strip of four two and a quarter negatives was a negative that looked sort of interesting so I went to Holland to get it scanned. When it came back I thought THIS is the picture that they should run.  But I didn’t show it to them then; I sent the other image thinking that would be piling it on. I didn’t want Stanley to come off looking too bad. As if I had anything to do with that…the article told the tale.

Texas Monthly sent me to Houston to photograph the lawyer who had sued him on behalf of 10 boys.  This guy’s name is Anthony “The Shark” Buzbee and his office is on the 73rd floor of a 75 floor building.  The tallest building in Texas located in downtown Houston, and he’s got half the floor.

My assistant Will Phillips and I left Austin at 6:30 in the morning and drove to Houston, went to his huge office arriving to find the conference rooms full, so we set up a 9’ seamless in his office.  The space was so big we never disturbed him.

Buzbee is super slick and extremely aware of his image. We were in his office for 2 ½ hours but all I was getting out of him was this “I’m Tony Buzbee, I’m fighting for the little guy” expression.  While we were getting set up in his office he was out front talking to his secretary when I overheard a woman say to him, “You look just like Gerard Butler!”

I had spotted a possible setting out front and thought, when we finish in Buzbee’s office I’ll get one more shot, but by the time we were done, I was just beat.  My assistant Will said, “Don’t you want to do this other shot?’ so I set up and was on the ground in his secretary’s office with him standing between the doors.  I’m getting nothing out of him until it suddenly came to me and I said, “Oh Tony, you look just like Gerard Butler!” And this is what I got, which is perfect!

We shot something like 300 pictures and the 297thone was the only one I liked. When I saw that image I thought, I’ll let Texas Monthly use the other picture of Stanley because this pair of images makes them both look notorious. I was very lucky to have Will along with me because even though I was done, he pushed me to do more. That’s part of the photographer-assistant relationship I’m certainly glad to have.

I had these feelings of regret about what had become of Mr. Marsh as well as curiosity about the guy who helped bring him down.  It’s kind of an amazing story for me and it pivots around being in the photography business for a long time. Texas Monthly used an image I took 25 years ago and one I took just 3 weeks ago to support it.  It’s a very rare thing to have a relationship like that with a magazine.

What’s another memorable Texas Monthly story you’ve done?
This was the Bandidos, a motor cycle gang and an important member had passed away so they kept him on ice for longer than they normally would so they could have the funeral for him on Memorial Day weekend and all these Bandidos came in from all over the country.  We set up white seamless at the funeral home in one of the viewing rooms that wasn’t being used. Skip Hollingsworth the writer and I would go out and ask people if we could do a portrait of them.  This was 2-3:00 in the afternoon with all these bad ass bikers and their scary girlfriends or wives. Everything was going fine but as the day went on they started drinking in the funeral home parking lot.  Then the whole vibe changed. By about sun down it was like, let’s get out of here while we still can in one piece!

The next day they had the procession.  I was desperate to find a place to photograph.  It was a Saturday morning on the 410 loop around San Antonio.  Will was with me and across the road there was what looked like a junkyard with a cherry picker with a sign on it that said “Rent Me.”  We woke this guy up and said “I have to have this thing in 20 minutes!”  We paid him $200, and got me up on the cherry picker.  I was shooting medium format film and three minutes later, here they come. What an amazing situation to get into.

Film.  Loading backs.  12 frames.  That’s how you did it.  That’s how I did it.

Besides bikers and eccentric millionaires, you’re also quite known for your love of and documentation of the Texas barbecue culture. When you started out photographing BBQ, did you plan to put the images into a book or did that just happen organically?
When Kreuz moved in 1999 out of what is now the Smitty’s building, my buddies and I were so crushed and sad. I went every day for a week and just shot black and whites.  So that was probably the foundation for the barbecue book.  There were assignments throughout the years where I had probably 1/3 of the pictures for the book before we had a book deal.  It was great fun and it wasn’t like being on assignment where you have to get something.  Nancy did the design so it was a real collaboration for us.

Last week I stumbled upon an old negative of Louie Muellers BBQ (legendary Texas barbecue joint) that I shot when I was still living in Amarillo. It was 1980 and a seed company salesman took us to there for lunch.  I didn’t know anything about Louie Muellers, I didn’t know anything about real barbecue but walked in there and wow, look at this place! This negative has great meaning to me because barbecue has become such a part of my work life.  It makes me glad I haven’t thrown anything away.

Do you still shoot film for your commercial and editorial work?
I don’t unless it’s a personal project. There’s just no demand for it anymore.  Everything needs to happen so fast, plus it’s more expensive.  The BBQ book I did a few years ago was all film shot with RZ67, but I was paying for that out of my own pocket.  It made me very selective about what I shot, unlike shooting digital, where you just shoot too much.  Cause why not?  The problem with that approach is you pay for it in front of the computer.  Another thing about digital is you would shoot a Polaroid and stop but with digital you’re working all your shit out in the camera.  You got 10 frames but it took 70 to get where you wanted to be and you still have to look at it all one way or another.

I’ve got thousands of negatives, many of them pictures of my kids, pictures of my now wife, my ex wife.  And I wonder… but I don’t know, I’ll be dead and gone but those negatives somehow seem more permanent to me than pictures that are stored on a computer or on a cloud.  Somebody will probably look through my negatives- my kids, my wife, but I don’t know who’s going to look through my digital files just as a matter of history and family history.

One of the things I’ve enjoyed the most about Facebook as silly as it is, is that I can put up things you wouldn’t normally see.  Whether it’s old stuff or outtakes or quirky stuff or something from a story.  I’ve got all kinds of pictures, just throw them out there and people can like them or not.  Facebook has sort of changed the meaning of the word “friend” and the meaning of the word “like”.  But still, I love it when people like my photos.  It’s just how needy we are.

You read there have been more pictures taken last year than in the whole history of photography…but where are they?

I still get the same tingle when I see a picture in print that I did when I first saw a picture- something of mine

For almost a year of my life the future was very uncertain.  Of course it still is…but for other reasons.  I’m back in a place where I’m going to pretend I’m gonna live forever like we all do.  It’s also like okay…I’m 60…how did I get here?  What am I going to do?  And I’m just going to keep doing what I’m doing.  Try to stay healthy.  Photography’s a physical business, but I still love doing it and I think that’s the bottom line for me that I still get the same tingle when I see a picture in print that I did when I first saw a picture, something of mine.

When you were diagnosed with life threatening cancer the Austin photo community and Dan Winters rallied around you with a print auction to raise money to help with your medical bills.  Can you talk about that?  Did you know Dan before the event?
That was probably the most magical night of my life. Nancy and I had been down for the first week of radiation treatments, then drove back to Austin on a Friday, went home and changed clothes and went down to Charla Woods’ studio.  We were absolutely blown away.  It was astonishing.  I had met Dan before, I wouldn’t say that I knew him but I knew his work.  He’s one of those I-wish-I-had-shot-that guys. The work he had donated, the people who participated, it was an astonishing collection of great, great photography.  Perfectly hung like everything that Dan does.  He’s someone who achieves a certain level of perfection in everything that he does, whether it’s minor or major.  But this…it was totally unexpected and an unbelievable night.  They sold everything on the wall.  It was a very meaningful experience and we still have this deep feeling of gratitude for what he did and for all the people who came and participated.

A friend of ours, Kathy Marcus, had started letting people know about my cancer.  If  you’re self employed, health insurance is a real challenge.  We were insured but with a $10,000 deductable and expenses unknown.  So Kathy got the ball rolling and Dan got wind of it and he started putting it together.  He didn’t ask us if we wanted him to, he just started putting it together and Nancy and I talked about it, gosh, is this right?  And then we thought, don’t be crazy!  If Dan Winters wants to do this, by God who’s going to stop him!  It was truly one of the most magical experiences of my life and in the midst of the crummiest of times it really was an amazing thing.

I’m going to stick around so I can use this damn camera, whatever it takes!

Do you have a favorite item in your camera bag or anything unusual?
I do love the D800.  I’m a real late adopter in the digital stuff and I waited until Nikon came out with a full sized chip.  Last year I shot that Willie Nelson cover for Texas Monthly so I rented the D800 and the files were so amazing that I thought well …what the hell.  Plus at the time I was six months out of treatment and I thought I’m going to get this camera because I’m going to stick around.  I’m going to stick around so I can use this damn camera, whatever it takes!  I do love that camera and a lot of time it’s overkill file size, so I don’t use it for everything, but when something really great happens it’s so fun to have it on that camera.

In a way it means I’m sort of pre-judging a job.  Is this worthy of the D800 for the full treatment? And there’s a practical side to that too.  If it’s not going to go that big then why shoot a 36MP 104MP TIFF file so you get extra churn time on the computer.  But if it’s something really great…I did this story for Texas Monthly back in September and I took my son Stuart with me to assist and to shoot too (cowboy stuff) so I had my D800 and I rented a D800.  We stumbled upon this (sky and riders) and this image will go up the size of a billboard.  You can shoot these in the dark.

What have you learned from being in this business for so long?
You’re scrambling around trying to find work and it’s not any different for me.  Part of the learning curve whether your 60 or 30, we’re all scrapping for the same gigs in one way or another.  When I was 30 I thought, “When I’m 60 it will be different.  I’ll have this reputation and this stable of clients.” But that’s not how it is.  The scramble never stops.

Really?
I don’t think so.  It certainly does for some people. I don’t have a rep, I’ve never had a rep. I never thought my work was the kind that a rep would handle. I don’t know why that is.  My work is kind of quirky and doesn’t fit into a hard category. But that’s just how it is. You can think of a couple photographers in town that don’t have to scramble and then you can think of a thousand that do. So that’s where most of us are.

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How do you make food look so appetizing on a shoot?
There are a lot of little tricks for every type of food but I try and make things look “real.” For me, real means slightly messy, full of ooziness, crumbs, and gooey cheese.

Event planning like food styling, makes you think on your feet and troubleshoot, something that happens on every job

How did you get your start as a food stylist?
I previously had a career in event planning that helped train me to become very detail oriented.  Event planning — like food styling — makes you think on your feet and troubleshoot, something that happens on every job.  After a few years in the event planning world, I switched gears and embraced my passion for food. I worked for a well-known chef who led me to the recipe development mecca: America’s Test Kitchen.  At the Test Kitchen I developed original recipes, wrote articles and was head of the Cooks Country Magazine photo shoots where I developed my expertise in food styling and prop selection.

Did you have a big break?  
I’ve built my business with several large, national clients in a short amount of time, which is great, but of course, I always want to do more!

What’s the most photogenic food (needing the least help to look delicious)?
I think cakes.  You take so much time and care in making them that they pretty much style themselves.

What is the hardest food to style?
Ice cream, hands down.

Will you take us through a typical food shoot?  (like prep time, etc. so they see how much work you do before anybody even gets there)
Prep is ALWAYS needed but not always given; sometimes it feels like a luxury.  Simply having time to set-up your tools, what you’re using in the kitchen and on-set and setting out a plan for the day goes a long way in making the rest of the shoot run smoothly. Typically you’re “cooking” each component of a plate separately so organization is crucial.

Is the food usually edible?  If so, who eats the leftovers after the shoot?
Most food I style is technically edible but I wouldn’t suggest eating it.  Anyone who’s worked on a food set knows not to eat (or touch) the food!

Most food I style is technically edible but I wouldn’t suggest eating it

What is the strangest item you have in your styling tool kit?
Oh it’s filled with many strange items, I’m always worried what security sees when I have to travel… I’d have to say the strangest is my baby “snot sucker” aka baby aspirator. I use it to remove very small amounts of liquid. I recently used it on raw oyster.

What is the most challenging thing about being a food stylist?
Schlepping around all your gear!  You never really know exactly what you’ll need so if you’re like me, you bring EVERYTHING!  (Don’t look in my hall closet…)

What is your favorite thing about working in Texas?
I’m a fairly new “Texan”, I’ve only been here just about 3 years but it’s becoming home.  Moving from Boston, Texas feels very welcoming.  As a Midwestern girl, I appreciate a “good morning” or smile from a stranger. I’ve been lucky to connect with great food photographers, designers and restaurants and am excited to build more relationships in the industry.

What projects have you done lately?
For the past two years I’ve worked on the new Whataburger campaign with local food photographer, Jody Horton.  The campaign has been well received and we’re really proud of our work (it’s also pretty great seeing it in billboard form).

I’ve also been working in Houston with Ralph Smith (and recently, NYC at Michael Schrom’s studio), for Joe’s Crab Shack, which has been a fun and challenging project.

I also styled the recipes in the new Salt Lick Cookbook. Austin photographer Kenny Braun shot the book in its entirety and the local Pentagram office led the design.  I enjoyed working with these talented people and the pictures will make you want to drive straight to Driftwood for a BBQ fix.

What’s next? Exciting projects coming up for 2013?
I’m excited to continue working with Joe’s Crab Shack.  I’m also looking forward to adding a new burger client.

The start to the New Year also means I get to work with a regular client, the National Mango Board.  I develop mango recipes for their promotional materials and website and have recently begun styling those recipes since they moved their photo shoots to Texas.

How do you define success in your own career?
I think success is when you get called again for another job; you know you’ve made that client happy.

I think success is when you get called again for another job

What advice do you have for aspiring food stylists or photographers interested in shooting food?
Practice and assist. It’s a difficult career to wrap your head around and can’t really be learned except by doing.

Favorite breakfast taco?
Shocking, I know, but I really don’t do breakfast tacos, I prefer going straight to lunch… The Democrat from Torchys is the best.

Photos by: Kimberly Davis, Jody Horton, and Ralph Smith