I Love Texas Photo http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com Tue, 25 Aug 2015 20:57:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.10 Darren Carroll http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/darren-carroll/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/darren-carroll/#comments Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:40:27 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9914 Interview by John Davidson

Darren Carroll has been a professional photographer for 20 years, primarily shooting sports, lifestyle and documentary images for clients as diverse as Sports Illustrated, ESPN Sports, and Hyatt. Darren grew-up in New York City, and studied at Georgetown University and The University of Texas. He lives in Austin with his wife, Jessica Foster (who manages the Department of Photography for Major League Baseball), and his 11-year-old son.

Q: Do you recall the first time you held a camera, or began experimenting with one?
A: My junior year in high school and I was home, sick. It was one of those days when you feel better in the afternoon. I was alone in the house and I don’t know why I did it, but I walked into my dad’s study and grabbed his camera. I put a roll of film in it, and started walking around taking pictures, like it might be a fun thing to do.

Q: Did it seem in any way momentous at the time?
A: It didn’t really register. What really got me hooked on it was the darkroom. I went to a Jesuit private high school in New York City. You used to be able to smoke in the cafeteria. I started smoking when I was fifteen. By my junior year they had cut out smoking in the cafeteria, and so the smoking lounge was the darkroom of the yearbook office. I didn’t have a photographic connection with the guy who ran it, but I knew him, and so on our lunch break I would pop-in. One day somebody was making a print, and I’m watching this thing happen, and I’m thinking Wow, that’s really cool. And the guy says, ‘I can teach you that. Do you have a camera? Take a roll of black & white film and bring it in.’
From then on, it was more about the process for me than an artistic thing. I just loved the idea of being able to create this thing, the negative. I kept shooting pictures, – I had no idea- and I kept reading books. Eventually I bought my own camera – a Canon AE-1, same as my dad’s – and that was it. So the pivotal moment wasn’t picking up the camera. It was learning how to develop images.
2015 U.S. Open

Q: At what point did you think you might want to pursue it as a career?
A: In college. When I quote, unquote ‘joined the newspaper’ at Georgetown, by the third week of my freshman year I was in the darkroom until two-thirty or three o’clock in the morning five nights a week, developing other people’s film, developing my film, printing, whatever. I never considered it as something I could do other than as a hobby until I shot my first Georgetown basketball game.. Then I saw all these other photographers sitting on the baseline, with these big 400mm lenses, and I thought, “This is cool”. This might be something I want to think about doing. And so I completely immersed myself in it, in the craft of the thing.

Q: How did you go about pursuing it as a career?
A: I was shooting the games, and so I met the guy who was the photographer for the Georgetown team. Georgetown played in a professional arena, so he was also the photographer for the Bullets (who are now the Wizards) in the NBA, and for the Capitals, the hockey team. And I just started to get to know him, offering to help and eventually I started assisting him. As part of my compensation he would let me shoot. I’d come to a hockey game and I would go upstairs and turn the strobes on ahead of time, they’d be up in the rafters, and we’d have to climb up in the catwalks and turn everything on, drop the synclines, and all that took time. So I started practicing, building a portfolio, and that was it.
But ever since that time, I’ve been adamant with everybody I’ve talked to that the way to start out is by assisting. It’s absolutely the best way to learn things, to meet people – and you get paid to do it. What could be better?

Q: You moved to Texas to study journalism?
A: I applied to UT for the Masters journalism program, and I got in. It was a journalism program with a photo concentration. And once I moved down here, that’s where a lot of the assisting work came in. Sports Illustrated started hiring me to assist photographers in San Antonio, and Dallas, and Houston, because they knew from what I’d done in Washington that I knew how to work the arena lighting systems and all of that.
My last year in Washington there was a NCAA first or second round tournament at The Capital Center, and Sports Illustrated sent a staff photographer to shoot it. I was recommended to rig the lighting, and then once I moved to Texas, I sent the SI staff guy a note saying ‘Hey, I’m down here,’ and it got around the office. Because at that time, they were flying someone to San Antonio every time there was a basketball game.

Q: And it was through that that you started shooting other sports as well?
A: It was a foot in the door. I’d go back to New York because I had family there, and I would go into the (Sports Illustrated) office because the editors there were the ones who were hiring the assistants – somebody who did basketball, somebody who did baseball, etc, and eventually they started giving me some front of the book spots when they didn’t want to fly anybody in to do them.

Justin Upton

Q: Tell me about the role you played in covering Mark McGwire’s pursuit of the Major League Baseball home-run record, back in 1998.
A: Both Sammy Sosa (Chicago Cubs) and Mark McGwire (St Louis Cardinals) were neck-and-neck in a race to break Roger Maris’ single season home run record. By September it was blatantly obvious that one, if not both of them were going to do it. It was just a question of when.
So SI pulled out all the stops. They had five photographers covering every game they played. I was the assistant (on the McGwire games). The only assistant. My job was to change the film in all the remote cameras set-up around the stadium. You had one photographer in the outfield, four photographers on the infield. I don’t remember the actual count of remote cameras, but we had at least ten around the stadium. And I had to change the film in all of them after Mark McGwire hit. And not only that, but I was responsible for triggering all of them. I had a pocket wizard in my hand, and all the cameras were all set to the same channel. As soon as Mark McGwire looked like he was going to swing, I had to hit that button.

Q: Was this bulk loaded film?
A: No, these were all 36 exposures – with two exceptions. We had these Hulcher cameras set-up. They were custom built cameras with Nikon lenses, that could shoot… well we had a 40 second per frame camera and an 80 second per frame camera. They were on tripods, one with a 600mm lens, the other with a 800mm lens, and they took hundred-foot bulk roll. You could load them in broad daylight – so you lost the first ten feet of film. Imagine how that looks – you’re standing in center field, there are twenty photographers lined up next to you, and here I come with my backpack. I pull out a tin with this one hundred-foot film in it, and I just open it up – on a Sunday afternoon. Some of these guys are freaking out, because they’d never seen it done before.
But this takes a bit of time, so I was running. And then there’s the three or four game series where the Cubs played the Cardinals, and I had to do this for both players. It was a rush – all adrenaline at this point. The best part about it was, they also let me have at it with a camera. We’d tested it out, and the best place to make sure all the cameras received the signals was in the mezzanine at first base, just above the Cardinals dug out. And when McGwire hit his seventieth, his last home run – we were still going because we had to get the last home run, whatever number that was – he did this little fist bump or whatever on the way back to the dugout, where I was stationed…
So the next evening, I’m sitting at home, and I get a phone call from Maureen Grise (now Cavanagh), the sports editor: ‘I just want to tell you, it’s been a great month. Thank you for all your hard work. Oh by the way – you have the cover.’ My first Sports Illustrated cover.

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Q: Has it been in any way helpful that you came to sports photography, not as someone who aspired to be an athlete or with of a passion for sports specifically. Did it allow for fewer preconceived notions, perhaps, for how you might go about portraying the action?
A: I was not a sports fan or an athlete myself. I played golf and tennis, but…yes. I’ve shot a lot of golf over the years, and I’ve had to catch myself occasionally because the more you do it, the more you start to run the risk of believing all the hype that people ascribe to these people.

Q: That said, is there an athlete or sportsman you’ve felt especially privileged to work with?
A: Oh, the ultimate is Byron Nelson. I’ve photographed him two or three times – the man was in his nineties – always so genuine and nice, engaging. I never had the feeling that he was looking at his watch.

Q: Given your long history with Sport’s Illustrated, I’m sure you must have strong feelings about the recent decision to release the last of their six staff photographers – probably people you know?

A: Yes. I know all of them. And this isn’t the first big purge they’ve done. I believe there were seventeen (photographers) on staff at one point. Obviously I don’t agree with it. I don’t think the Director of Photography, who had to break the news, was behind it. The decisions were made at a much, much higher level. And at that level, it all comes down to individual page views online, things like that. The appreciation for the craft of it, and of what these guys were capable of, doesn’t matter.
I did an interview with, I think, The New Republic online, when the news came out. The interview was with a guy who worked on a story with me on rodeo cowboys, and I think he nailed it when he referenced the Wayne Gretzky quote, ‘You miss one hundred percent of the shots you don’t take.’ We’re all going to look at SI each week, and we’re going to see very nice sports pictures from Getty or AP or whatever; but what we’re not going to see is the picture that could have been taken. I’ve stood shoulder to shoulder with these SI guys and with a bunch of other photographers, and shot the same thing they have, and they’ve gotten something that we’ve all looked at and said, ‘How did they do that?’ We didn’t see it. We were all looking at it, we didn’t frame it that way, use that lens… you’re not going to see that anymore – but you’re not going to know it.

Coleadero

Q: Since we’re talking a little about the business of photography here, tell me about your marketing strategy. Who you are marketing to?
A: I’m marketing to advertising agencies, and to sports related companies – not necessarily as a sports photographer, but as someone with a sports background. I want to point out my abilities to use portrait lights, do documentary, all sorts of stuff. I have a couple of commercial clients that I work with regularly, and I’m looking to work with more. But I also like shooting those portraits, and documentary work, so I’m promoting that editorially.

Q: Emails, Mailers, or both?
A: I kind of gave up on mass emails, I used to do it religiously, but I don’t think people look at or see them. I can think of maybe one person who called me from an email over six years.
For print campaigns I have a mailing list of about 250 people. I send out 125 mailers every month. Say, if there are two art buyers at ESPN, one of them gets the card this month, the other one gets it next month. That way they’re not getting the same card – they’re floating around the office – but I’m not flooding them with stuff. So I send pieces out bi-monthly.

Q: Do you work with a graphic designer on your promo pieces?
A: I’m thinking about doing that. I can see the benefits. I have a portfolio online with ASMP, and I’ve gotten work from that, and also another portfolio site and I’ve gotten work from those. I’ve also taken out ads in Workbook, but I ‘m not sure about that as an advertising model at this point.
I don’t like to be overbearing, whether it’s writing about myself, or making calls. I need to get better at that.

Q: Do you have a rep?
A: I do. We’ve been working together for about three years. It’s been good to have someone help with negotiations, that side of things. You really need somebody who knows the type of work that you do, and the business that you’re catering to. And I need someone who knows how to work with those people.
Still, I need to be able to find those people myself. I don’t mean this as a criticism, but I think some photographers believe that once they have a rep, they don’t have to do any of that stuff. It’s not true. You have to stay grounded in your own business. And if I do get something, then I’m going to give it to him (the rep), because he is going to take care of the negotiating, the production, that side of things. Quite frankly, when it comes to advertising, and the amount of money that can be involved, you don’t want creative people having that conversation. You want money people having those conversations.

Q: I recently switched my website hosting to Photoshelter, which I know is where you’ve been hosted for sometime. You’re especially partial to the back-end capabilities of the site – such as the e-commerce, for example. Have you sold a lot from your archive that way?
A: Not a whole lot. I should probably market that a little better, though I’ve had some commercial sales. But yes, there are a lot of portfolio sites, and I don’t know anywhere else you can store thousands upon thousands of high-resolution images, sell them through the site, integrate directly with your blog, share with clients. And all I have to do is slide images from one gallery to another.
Q: What’s your take on Instagram now? Initially your line was similar to ASMP’s first public stance, which was, ‘Why are we giving our work away?’
A: Every time I put something on Instagram, I cringe, honestly. But…you have to do it. My epiphany was on assignment for ESPN, and there were four or five editors on site. I walked into the press room – it was after a football game – and every single editor was checking their Instagram feed to see what their favorite photographers were up to. You’ve got to do it. But, I watermark important images, and I still feel that the day is going to come when we’re going to say, ‘Wait – they said they weren’t going to do that!’

Q: Let’s talk about personal work. You wrote a very impassioned piece on your blog about purchasing a Leica M240 and how it had really informed your work, inspired you to see things anew. Was buying the camera directly responsible for the beautiful Charreada project you’ve undertaken?
A: It was. I put off doing it until I got the Leica. I’d had the idea for about a year, put it off and put it off, and when I finally decided to go all in and buy the camera, I said, Now I’m gonna do it.

Q: The Charreada project is clearly a book. It has to be.
A: My problem that I have with it is that I presented it to Sports Illustrated, because they were interested in running it. At the time I’d only done a couple of reports, but they encouraged me to continue with it. Then a month later they gave me a different rodeo assignment that ran nine pages in the magazine and the way they work, one rodeo story a year is all you’re gonna get. So I felt kind of bad that I no longer had a hook anymore, and I don’t know how to market something as a book. I have a couple of ideas, a couple of different strains of the project, but I don’t know how to bring that (a book) about.

Q: Your work seems to be diversifying over the past year or two. Certainly, you’re shooting more portraits outside of sports – extensive work with musician Robert Earl Keen, for example. You have a wedding coming up, and you have a young son – Are you looking to move away from sports photography in part to pursue a less itinerant lifestyle?
A: I’m not leaving sports photography, but I do want to pursue other things. Part of it is at the point of a bayonet because the business is changing. Sports photography is not what it was. The days of getting a call saying ‘Hey, there’s a game in Arlington today. Go see if you can take a pretty picture…’ those opportunities have gone, across the board. Sporting News is out of business; Sports Illustrated isn’t hiring or flying people all over the country anymore; ESPN doesn’t cover games on a week-to-week basis. Getty has staff photographers, they don’t hire freelancers. You can’t make a living shooting sports for newspapers.
So, you have to adapt. You find commercial, advertising outlets for the skill-set you’ve got. I can shoot golf, really well, so let me go out and find corporations or advertisers or whatever who need someone who can shoot golf. And part of that hopefully means getting paid more so that I can work less, be closer to home, be with family more. Right now, I haven’t been on a plane in three weeks. I don’t remember the last time that happened. But also, hopefully it means that I can pursue more editorial work that I enjoy doing, work that allows creative freedom.
I think it can be done. I’ve spent the last month driving to jobs! And there’s such a vibrant photo community here in Austin – and I need to get more involved.

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Business of Video seminar in Austin March 7 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/business-of-video-seminar-in-austin-march-7/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/business-of-video-seminar-in-austin-march-7/#comments Thu, 26 Feb 2015 17:30:11 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9882

 REGISTER

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New Shirts, Totes and Posters in Stock Now! http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/new-shirts-and-posters-in-stock-now/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/new-shirts-and-posters-in-stock-now/#comments Tue, 02 Dec 2014 18:15:28 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9623 We’re thrilled to share our latest t-shirt and poster design, celebrating Texas photography with a custom illustration of cameras past and present. Available in women’s tank tops and v-necks, men’s crew necks and posters. Also coming soon, tote bags! They make a great gift for the photography lover in your life (or for yourself)!

Browse the collection!

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texascamera_indigo_womenstank

texascamera_darkgrey_menscrew

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Cameras of Texas Mug
Looking for mugs? Visit our Zazzle store!
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Canon Explorer of Light David Hume Kennerly talk Nov 5 in Austin http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/canon-explorer-of-light-david-hume-kennerly-talk-nov-5-in-austin/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/canon-explorer-of-light-david-hume-kennerly-talk-nov-5-in-austin/#comments Sun, 26 Oct 2014 17:08:31 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9537 Kennerlygrid

Pulitzer prize winning photographer David Hume Kennerly will show his work and talk about his career as a photo journalist and White House photographer in Austin on November 5th. Kennerly has photographed celebrities such as Muhammad Ali, Robert Kennedy, Mile Davis, the Rolling Stones, Ansel Adams, and Queen Elizabeth and events such as the Vietnam War, the Guiana Massacre, the Ali-Frazier Fight, and many, many more. He was the personal White House photographer for President Gerald Ford. His collection is housed in the University of Texas Briscoe Center for American History.

Kennerly is a Canon Explorer of Light and Canon is sponsoring the program along with Precision Camera & Video and the American Society of Media Photographers Austin/ San Antonio Chapter.

The event is FREE! Seating is limited so come early and enjoy some great photography!

When:
Wednesday November 5, 2014 at 7:00 PM

Where:
First Unitarian Universalist Church of Austin
4700 Grover Ave, Austin, TX 78756

DHKDavid Hume Kennerly won the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for his photos of the Vietnam War when he was 25 years old, one of the youngest to ever receive that honor. Two years later he was appointed President Gerald R. Ford’s personal White House photographer. He was recently named, “One of the Most 100 Most Important People in Photography” by American Photo Magazine. He was a contributing editor for Newsweek, and a contributing photographer for Time and Life magazines. Kennerly has published several books of his work, Shooter, Photo Op, Seinoff: The Final Days of Seinfeld, Photo du Jour, Extraordinary Circumstances: The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford, and most recently David Hume Kennerly On the iPhone. He was a producer and one of the principle photographers of, Barack Obama: The Official Inaugural Book. Kennerly produced “The Presidents’ Gatekeepers,” a four-hour documentary about White House chiefs of staff that ran on The Discovery Channel in 2013, and is currently working on other documentary film projects. Kennerly is on the Board of Trustees of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation, and the Atlanta Board of Visitors of the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). His archive is housed at the Center for American History at the University of Texas, Austin. David Hume Kennerly is a Canon Explorer of Light, an elite group of professional photographers who strongly believe that Canon cameras are essential to their work.

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Canon PIXMA PRO City Senses Gallery comes to Austin http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/pixma-pro/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/pixma-pro/#comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 15:05:35 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9514 When: Thursday, October 2, 2014
4-8pm
Where: Austin Music Hall
208 Nueces St, Austin

The event is free and open to the public.

Canon recently approached Austin-based photographers Sarah Lim and Ben Sklar to capture images based on sensory triggers, that are inspired by the live music of Austin and hometown pride.

As part of a three-city series for Canon’s PIXMA PRO campaign, guests who walk through the exhibits at this will interactively experience a taste, sight, sound or smell trigger, before the image associated with that sense is revealed.

At the heart of the campaign, Canon’s PIXMA PRO Senses is all about bringing the photographers’ moment in a time to life and transporting individuals back to that experience, giving gallery guests the visual sensation exactly as it happened, through the power of print.

“The PIXMA PRO City Senses gallery series was created to highlight how very powerful a printed image can be—how it can evoke emotions and enable the sharing of meaningful experiences,”said Canon U.S.A. president Yuichi Ishizuka in a statement.

There will be a demo station on site, where guests can interact with the Canon PIXMA PRO printers. Canon will also be giving away cameras, printers, concert tickets and more.

 

Canon PIXMA PRO_Austin Public Gallery Event_FINAL

 

 

 

 

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Richard Andrew Sharum Opening in Dallas http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/sharum-opening/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/sharum-opening/#comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 11:37:27 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9509 RASharum_In_The_Heart_Flyer_final

Kettle Art Gallery presents “In the Heart: Downtown Photography from around the Globe” by Richard Andrew Sharum. Please join us for the opening reception on Thursday, October 2, 7-10pm. The exhibit runs through Saturday, November 1.

About the exhibit:

Richard Andrew Sharum debuts his compelling series documenting the often obscure landscape of urban spaces around the world and the inhabitants of these areas. Sharum’s images depict the contrast between flesh and architecture, the fragility of life juxtaposed with formidable concrete structures, and the light that both illuminates and deepens the shadows between them.

In recognition of Sharum’s work on the series abroad, he was selected among international applicants for the Magnum Photos (Paris) Masterclass with Jonas Bendiksen during HOST at FOTOGRAFIA EUROPEA 2014 in Reggio Emilia, Italy, and for the Magnum Photos (New York) Masterclass with Moises Saman and Abbas in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Both resulted in public exhibitions of his work in each respective city.

In Summer of 2014, Sharum launched “Observe Dallas”, a public installation project aimed at encouraging observers of anonymously placed photographs within the Downtown area to interact with their surroundings in unique ways.

“Observe Dallas” press:

Chrissi Chetwood, “A Fresh Perspective”, Central Track, September 8, 2014 http://centraltrack.com/Culture/5689/A-Fresh-Perspective/An-Anonymous-Photographer-Is-Turning-Downtown-Into-An-Art-Gallery-Posting-Photos-Without-Permission

Pete Freedman, “Secret’s Out”, Central Track, September 15, 2014 http://centraltrack.com/Culture/5723/Secrets-Out/We-Found-Out-The-Identity-Of-The-Guy-Whos-Been-Anonymously-Posting-Photos-Around-Downtown

Bio:

Richard Andrew Sharum is a Dallas-based photographer whose range varies from documentary photojournalism to abstract minimalism. Sharum’s work is included in several private and public collections across the country. Commissions include those by The Meadows Foundation, Harvard Law School, Children’s Medical Center (Oncology), Children’s Cancer Fund, Angelflight, Notre Dame School for the Mentally Ill, and Austin Street Homeless Shelter, among others. Publications include D Magazine, International Business Times Weekly (New York), The Wall Street Journal, The Dallas Observer, and The News-Register.

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Matthew Slimmer http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/matthew-slimmer/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/matthew-slimmer/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 14:05:06 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9495 Matthew Slimmer is an Austin-based producer whose clients include Target, Toyota, American Express and Bank of America. He shared a bit about his production business with ILTP:

“13 years experience as Producer & Production Coordinator for Still + Motion Photography. Working as a local in Austin, Dallas, Houston TX and Minneapolis MN. I manage workflow and schedules for several sequential and simultaneous contract jobs. I truly enjoy coordinating and planning.

Advertising is where I’ve made my path and I love being a part of this industry. I organize all the details of your shoot, for both small or large scale productions. I problem solve and streamline responsibilities of my crew. My favorite part of the job is making sure the photographer / director is open to make creative choices while I see that every shoot runs smoothly and efficiently.”

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Deborah Willis Lecture at HRC http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/willis-hrc/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/willis-hrc/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 15:53:38 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9485 hrc_gwtw

Deborah Willis Lecture

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18,
6:30 P.M. http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/events/
JESSEN AUDITORIUM IN HOMER RAINEY HALL

New York University professor Deborah Willis weaves together a narrative of the early years of American photography with a reading of iconic moments in Gone With The Wind and examines the role black history played in producing such a controversial and celebrated cultural phenomenon.

Co-sponsored by the University’s John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies. Registrants of the Flair Symposium, Cultural Life During Wartime, 1861-1865, will have reserved seating at this program, which serves as the symposium’s keynote address.

Ransom Center members receive priority entry at this program. Doors open at 5:50 p.m. for members and at 6 p.m. for the general public. Members must present their membership cards for priority entrance; one seat per membership card. Members arriving after 6 p.m. will join the general queue.

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Lesley Nowlin http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/lesley-nowlin-being-a-twin/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/lesley-nowlin-being-a-twin/#comments Wed, 03 Sep 2014 16:47:33 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9441 "Wind" by Lesley Nowlin from Being a Twin: Elements

“Wind” by Lesley Nowlin from Being a Twin: Elements

 

Austin fine art photographer Lesley Nowlin was chosen as one of four artists for the upcoming exhibition: Face Value opening September 6th at Davis Gallery. Lesley will be showing images from her series in progress: Being a Twin.

Lesley, a twin herself, has been exploring that relationship through her photographic work using traditional, modern, and alternative photographic processes. Lesley shared this intimate project with my twin and me when she photographed us a few months ago.

How did you get started in photography?

My dad played around with photography when I was young, as well as my grandfather and great grandmother.  When I was about 14 I remember my dad teaching me how to read a light meter on a Leica rangefinder.  After that I started photographing sports and yearbook events during high school.  I learned how to develop and print silver gelatin in a tiny darkroom at Westwood High School.  After going to the Maine Photographic Workshop during my junior year of high school I then chose to attend the Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford.  That was when I fell in love with art.

 

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Tell me about your interest and education in alternative processes.
During my time at HAS we were required as art majors to learn all the mediums.  I really enjoyed printmaking and drawing, although I was never really good at it.  Back in my college years we were on the brink of transitioning into digital, but everything we did was still very much produced in the darkroom.  I loved getting my hands dirty and watching the image appear on the paper.  Creating something from scratch and the printing process itself is the true art quality I love so much.  However, that being said, I’ve turned to digital shooting, yet stuck with printing platinum and silver.  With the format I’m creating in this current work the digital image is much easier to work with.  I still love film for documentary and street photography, but I’m not currently working in that environment.
I loved getting my hands dirty and watching the image appear on the paper.
After opening a photography gallery in 2009-2011 I realized everything I fell in love with from other photographers was created with the alternative process,  whether it was silver gelatin, salt, cyanotype, or platinum.  After closing the gallery I decided to pursue the alternative process for myself and studied at Maine Media Workshop with Brenton Hamilton.  He taught me how to print platinum, as well as other processes, using digital negatives.  I’ve been working on it for the last 2 years on my own trying to master the craft, although I have a long way to go.
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How long have you been working on the twin series and how has the meaning evolved since you started working on it?

I started the series actually when attending the Maine Media Workshop back in 2002 (for the second time). I had an instructor, Stella Johnson, who helped me create a project for myself.  We had to plan shooting our subject(s) before we got there.  I wanted to work on something for that week that was closely related to me.  Up until that point I was more of a street photographer, and liked to travel and “shoot what I saw” on my international adventures. At the beginning of the “Being a Twin” project I was trying to connect in my own relationship with my twin by studying the connections of other twins and how they related to each other. I learned a lot with my 10 years of photographing twins.  About two years ago I drew on the fact that I loved art so much, and wanted to start making more narrative and composed pieces. I’m drawn to painters like Gustav Klimt and John Waterhouse, and photographers like Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison and Luis Gonzales de Palma.  Their ability to create a surreal environment with the human subject, very spiritual and ethereal, really drew me in.  I wanted to incorporate that direction in my own work, while still making it mine.  I’m photographing the twins (mostly female) in environments of nature to show their spiritual connection, as well as a tension and ease between the two.  Then, I’m printing platinum on vellum and lining it with composition gold, silver or copper leaf.  Printing the negatives separately and then putting it back together creates a broken and mosaic like quality.  It’s very fun to do, as well as time consuming.  No pieces will be the same, and that’s what I enjoy most about it.  I’ve also been learning a lot as I continue to make different pieces.  My process has been getting more precise as I go along.
I was trying to connect with my own relationship with my twin by studying the connections of other twins and how they related to each other.
How did you come to be a part of the Face Value exhibition at Davis Gallery?

Bill Davis is a very kind person who I’ve known for a while.  I knew the curator of the show, Christina Martell, who left shortly after, and Susannah Morgan took over.  They were putting together a show of different portraiture work, and asked me to participate.  At first I was going to make individual platinum prints of my original “Being a Twin” work.  But then I grabbed the opportunity to show my new vision of where I wanted this work to go, and that’s when “Being a Twin: Elements” was created.  Ultimately, I’m very happy I’m able to have a show with a group.  It gave me the chance to start this new work at a slower pace.
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What are your future plans for photography? Do you have any other photo projects that you are working on?

My goal is to create 15-20 pieces for a solo show somewhere.  The most challenging part of owning a photography gallery in Austin, for me, was that I didn’t know how to create clients.  I had a ton of photographers asking to show their work, and I didn’t have enough time or finances to do it.  After about a year I realized owning a gallery was not the career for me.  Creating my own work was more important.   It would be wonderful to have a photography gallery in Austin, but I don’t feel there’s a market here for it, which is unfortunate.  There are many great photographers in Austin and only a few places to exhibit.  Davis Gallery is kind enough to have a show specifically for photography and mixed media, but most art galleries in Austin view the medium of photography as an entirely different art form, and maybe aren’t willing to go out of their comfort zone to learn more about it.  More than likely I’ll have to go outside of my hometown to find an exhibition space for “Being a Twin: Elements”.  Really hoping someone will want to show it!

 

You’ll definitely want to see these pieces in person. Face Value closes October 18th, 2014.
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Joel Salcido Exhibition at Mexican American Cultural Center http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/joel-salcido-exhibition-at-mexican-american-cultural-center/ http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/joel-salcido-exhibition-at-mexican-american-cultural-center/#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 21:51:22 +0000 http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/?p=9470 ALIENTO TEQUILA EXHIBIT OPENING – PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOEL SALCIDO
Exhibition opening September 13
7-9pm
Sam Z Coronado Gallery

From the Photographer: “This photographic series reflects the mythical space where the weight of history and the tyranny of earth transcends into a spirit called tequila. In this landscape of blue agave, I discovered the traditions of culture and religion, both ancient and modern – indigenous and foreign. Still there, in the midst of life, is the everyday toil of man, land and sky, unified in purpose to produce a spirit that is only true to the mythic character of Mexico and its people”.

Exhibit runs through November 29, 2014.

Music by Mariachi Relámpago y Los Alfansinos.

Event is free and open to the public.

joelsalcido

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